Displaying posts tagged with

“gracies”

What’s Wrong With BJJ

I have to say that the Gracies have made a huge contribution to my life.  I love Jiu-Jitsu.  It is one of the most amazing martial arts I have ever encountered, that I am still challenged and mystified by.  I am very thankful to them. They have helped make me a more complete martial artist and […]

What To Do When You Get Tapped By A Lower Rank

What To Do When You Get Tapped By A Lower Rank First of all, do not do any of the following: tell the person who just tapped you that you’re injured. explain that you weren’t going 100%. roll again and start coaching them to let them know that you weren’t going 100% the whole time. […]

Are Leg Locks Part of Jiu-Jitsu? Part 2

continued from part 1… 4) Higher level practitioners do them and not lower level because most BJJ practitioners are not good at leg locks.  If they are a brown belt, their leg locks are normally at blue belt level.  Beginners may be told that they will learn them when they are higher rank, but in […]

Are Leg Locks Part of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu?

There is a bit of controversy on this topic.  When I started training and I was originally under the Gracies, I was told that leg locks are: 1)  dangerous 2) on kneebars you turn your back, and turning your back is really bad 3) if you train them your guard passes will suffer 4) that […]

History of Jiu-Jitsu (Part 2), Maeda and the Gracies

continue from part 1 Information in this article was taken mostly from a book that I recommend, mostly for it’s history section,  “Mastering JuJitsu” by Renzo Gracie and John Danaher. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu has it’s roots in the Gracie family, but the Gracies learned from Mitsuyo Meada (1878-1941), “Count Coma.”  He was doing mixed martial arts […]

History of Jiu-Jitsu Part 1 (Before the Gracies)

For years I had only heard about the history of Jiu-Jitsu from the Gracies. Rorion Gracie said that his father Helio was the driving force behind most of the evolution of Jiu-Jitsu from what they learned from Count Koma. In the Machado’s  schools (my teachers) and in other circles, there is talk about the older […]